RECLAIMING FITNESS

Reclaiming fitness is not only about fat loss; it’s about developing self-control, strength and stamina!

  • 6th September
    2012
  • 06

Think of ab fat like the deep end of the swimming pool. No matter how much you protest, there is no way you can drain the deep end before the shallow end. However, don’t let this discourage you. Lower ab fat WILL come off, it will simply be the last place to come off. First place on - Last place off.

This helps to explain why abdominal exercises have little impact on body fat loss. It’s a huge mistake to think that hundreds or thousands of reps of ab exercises will remove lower abdominal fat, except to the degree that it burns calories and contributes to the calorie deficit. What removes the fat - all over your body - is a calorie deficit and that comes from decreasing food intake, increasing activity, or a combination of both.

  • 22nd August
    2012
  • 22
  • 29th July
    2012
  • 29
Scale weight is not the only measurement of fitness yet it seems to define whether one is succeeding. We can lose weight and still have a higher percentage of fat if we don’t work to build muscle and cardiovascular strength. Developing self-control, strength and stamina are better goals to strive for in terms of overall health and wellness.
reclaimingfitness.tumblr.com

(Source: reclaimingfitness)

  • 26th July
    2012
  • 26
BUILD MUSCLE AND LOSE FAT WITH 9 EATING TIPS
Building muscle and losing fat not only involve commitment to strength and cardiovascular training, they also require dedication to a healthy eating program. Gaining muscle mass and losing fat simultaneously is difficult, because it requires your body to build up and break itself down at the same time. But by paying careful attention to your nutrition, you can put your body in the right state to reach this goal. The nine tips below will help you.
1. Get the Most Nutrition From Your Calories. It’s possible to control your weight while snacking on cupcakes and brownies, but this is not sound nutrition. Junk food does not provide the nutrients you need to support your goals. Instead, focus on consuming nutrient-dense foods—foods that contain large amounts of vitamins and minerals relative to their calories and that give your body the carbohydrates, proteins and healthy fat it requires. Examples of such foods are fruits and vegetables, lean meats and plant proteins, non-fat/low-fat dairy and whole grains.
2. Write it Down. Keep an running record of the foods (and amounts) you consume. You don’t have to do it daily, but writing everything down a few days a week can give you great insight. Are you surprised at how much or how little you are consuming? Your eating log should help you control some of the foods that may be contributing to excess calorie intake.
3. Timing is Everything. Continue to fuel your body around your training schedule. (Learn more about nutrient timing.) Before training, consume a carbohydrate-rich meal or snack that also includes a small amount of protein. Begin yourrecovery meal or snack within 15 to 60 minutes after your training session. This meal/snack should contain protein and carbohydrate. Try a smoothie made with yogurt and frozen berries or graham crackers with peanut butter and a glass of low-fat chocolate milk.
4. Reduce Calories on Rest Days. If weight loss is your goal, reduce calorie consumption on days when you are not as active. This tactic will allow you to eat more on training days, which will maximize performance and prevent fatigue.
5. Don’t Get Hungry. Eat smaller amounts of food and distribute meals evenly throughout the day. This may prevent the kind of overeating that occurs when we get too hungry. Listen for your hunger cues and have healthy snacks available. Try a small piece of fruit and a low-fat string cheese or raw vegetables and hummus.
6. Slow Down. Learn to eat slowly and savor your food. It isn’t going anywhere! It takes time for the stomach to signal to the brain that it’s full, so when you eat quickly, you can easily overdose on calories. Take breaks from eating to sip water or engage in lively conversation.
7. Don’t Deny Yourself the Foods You Love. A balanced diet that allows some flexibility can still result in good weight control without driving you crazy. Practice the 90/10 rule every day—90 percent of your eating should follow sound nutrition principles—including fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean sources of protein and healthy fats. The remaining 10 percent can be reserved for treats.
8. Educate Yourself. Take time to learn about nutrition in general as well as your unique food requirements. If you do this, you will be taking a major step toward weight control and a healthier lifestyle.
9. Consider Meeting With a Registered Dietitian. A registered dietitian can calculate your personal energy requirements and check your current diet to make sure that it includes the right amounts of nutrients.
Although proper nutrition for building muscle and losing fat is not easy, the more time you spend educating yourself and practicing healthy habits, the more success you will have. The goal of training hard and paying attention to nutrition is not just to achieve a number on a scale, but to make a long-term investment in your health.
Katie Knappenberger, RD, ATC, is an assistant professor and athletic trainer at Daytona State College (Daytona Beach, Fla.). She earned her master’s degree in nutrition, with a concentration in sports dietetics, from the University of Utah and her bachelor’s degree in athletic training from the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse. She is a member of the Collegiate and Professional Sports Dietitians Association and the Sports Dietetic Practice Group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Follow her on Twitter (@KatieRdATC) for sports nutrition tips and cutting-edge research updates.

BUILD MUSCLE AND LOSE FAT WITH 9 EATING TIPS

Building muscle and losing fat not only involve commitment to strength and cardiovascular training, they also require dedication to a healthy eating program. Gaining muscle mass and losing fat simultaneously is difficult, because it requires your body to build up and break itself down at the same time. But by paying careful attention to your nutrition, you can put your body in the right state to reach this goal. The nine tips below will help you.

1. Get the Most Nutrition From Your Calories. It’s possible to control your weight while snacking on cupcakes and brownies, but this is not sound nutrition. Junk food does not provide the nutrients you need to support your goals. Instead, focus on consuming nutrient-dense foods—foods that contain large amounts of vitamins and minerals relative to their calories and that give your body the carbohydrates, proteins and healthy fat it requires. Examples of such foods are fruits and vegetables, lean meats and plant proteins, non-fat/low-fat dairy and whole grains.

2. Write it Down. Keep an running record of the foods (and amounts) you consume. You don’t have to do it daily, but writing everything down a few days a week can give you great insight. Are you surprised at how much or how little you are consuming? Your eating log should help you control some of the foods that may be contributing to excess calorie intake.

3. Timing is Everything. Continue to fuel your body around your training schedule. (Learn more about nutrient timing.) Before training, consume a carbohydrate-rich meal or snack that also includes a small amount of protein. Begin yourrecovery meal or snack within 15 to 60 minutes after your training session. This meal/snack should contain protein and carbohydrate. Try a smoothie made with yogurt and frozen berries or graham crackers with peanut butter and a glass of low-fat chocolate milk.

4. Reduce Calories on Rest Days. If weight loss is your goal, reduce calorie consumption on days when you are not as active. This tactic will allow you to eat more on training days, which will maximize performance and prevent fatigue.

5. Don’t Get Hungry. Eat smaller amounts of food and distribute meals evenly throughout the day. This may prevent the kind of overeating that occurs when we get too hungry. Listen for your hunger cues and have healthy snacks available. Try a small piece of fruit and a low-fat string cheese or raw vegetables and hummus.

6. Slow Down. Learn to eat slowly and savor your food. It isn’t going anywhere! It takes time for the stomach to signal to the brain that it’s full, so when you eat quickly, you can easily overdose on calories. Take breaks from eating to sip water or engage in lively conversation.

7. Don’t Deny Yourself the Foods You Love. A balanced diet that allows some flexibility can still result in good weight control without driving you crazy. Practice the 90/10 rule every day—90 percent of your eating should follow sound nutrition principles—including fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean sources of protein and healthy fats. The remaining 10 percent can be reserved for treats.

8. Educate Yourself. Take time to learn about nutrition in general as well as your unique food requirements. If you do this, you will be taking a major step toward weight control and a healthier lifestyle.

9. Consider Meeting With a Registered Dietitian. A registered dietitian can calculate your personal energy requirements and check your current diet to make sure that it includes the right amounts of nutrients.

Although proper nutrition for building muscle and losing fat is not easy, the more time you spend educating yourself and practicing healthy habits, the more success you will have. The goal of training hard and paying attention to nutrition is not just to achieve a number on a scale, but to make a long-term investment in your health.

Katie Knappenberger, RD, ATC, is an assistant professor and athletic trainer at Daytona State College (Daytona Beach, Fla.). She earned her master’s degree in nutrition, with a concentration in sports dietetics, from the University of Utah and her bachelor’s degree in athletic training from the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse. She is a member of the Collegiate and Professional Sports Dietitians Association and the Sports Dietetic Practice Group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Follow her on Twitter (@KatieRdATC) for sports nutrition tips and cutting-edge research updates.

  • 25th July
    2012
  • 25

Dieting is Bad

Weight loss is not the same as fat loss. People can be of normal weight and yet be too fat for health. What counts is the ratio of muscle to fat. Is your body weight, for example, 30% fat or 15% fat? There’s a big difference in body composition between the two.

Muscle tissue is denser than fatty tissue. This is why trim athletes with a relatively low percentage of body fat can look smaller and yet weigh more than fatty non-athletes. A pound of muscle takes up less volume than a pound of fat.

Here’s a critical point: muscle is about three dozen times more active metabolically than fat. In other words, a pound of muscle uses a lot more calories than a pound of fat. Lean muscle is a METABOLIC FURNACE.

This explains why dieting (without weight loss exercises) is so insidious. Suppose you go on a semi-starvation diet, lose twenty pounds, get sick of the dietary restrictions, and regain the twenty pounds. You’ll not only be discouraged, which is one way you’ll be worse than when you started, you’ll be fatter, too.

(Source: lasting-weight-loss.com)

  • 30th June
    2012
  • 30

Push Your Weight Around

Every woman MUST add some resistance training to their fitness regime in order to lose body fat. You objective is to add muscle to your body.  Muscle is the active, calorie burning tissue that helps keep your metabolism going strong.  The loss of lean muscle mass due to a more inactive lifestyle is one of the main reasons why many women in their 40’s gain weight even though they are eating the same quantity of food they always have.  It’s a misleading notion that as we age, our metabolism will slow down, thus leading to that inevitable ‘middle age spread’ as we gain fat. By adding exercises that build muscle 3-4 times a week, you can maintain the same muscle as you had in your twenties and thirties.  By working hard, you can even add a little extra muscle.  And this can be done without joining a gym or spending loads of money on exercise equipment.  It also doesn’t mean you are going to look bulky or masculine, which is another common misunderstanding.  The female body simply isn’t capable of that unless you train very specifically with that goal in mind.  You can achieve a beautiful feminine physique simply using your body weight as resistance.

By adding weight training to your fitness regime you will gain these benefits:

  • burn more fat than by only doing cardio
  • change the shape your body
  • boost your metabolism by maintaining or building more muscle
  • increase strength, becoming more functional
  • combat osteoporosis by building strong bones
  • improve joint stability and reduce the risk of injury

(Source: bodyincredible.com)

  • 30th June
    2012
  • 30
  • 30th June
    2012
  • 30
  • 22nd June
    2012
  • 22
  • 21st June
    2012
  • 21
FAT vs MUSCLE
As you can see in this picture, the 250 lbs. of fat is much bulkier than the 250 lbs. of muscle… A 250 pound pile of fat will take up more space (volume) than a 250 pound pile of muscle. A woman weighing 150 pounds with 19% fat will look much smaller (and be much healthier) than a woman at 150 pounds with 35% fat. They weigh the same, yet the composition is different. Because muscle is denser than fat, the person with less fat and more muscle will look smaller. Once you understand this, you will stop being so concerned with body weight and start paying attention to body composition. How much body fat do you have compared to muscle?If you want to look slimmer, the key is to build more muscle and to burn more fat! And remember, when it comes to fat loss, exercise is the method that can be most easily manipulated… the more active you are, the more fat that you will burn! Here’s to happy fat loss!

FAT vs MUSCLE

As you can see in this picture, the 250 lbs. of fat is much bulkier than the 250 lbs. of muscle… A 250 pound pile of fat will take up more space (volume) than a 250 pound pile of muscle. A woman weighing 150 pounds with 19% fat will look much smaller (and be much healthier) than a woman at 150 pounds with 35% fat. They weigh the same, yet the composition is different. Because muscle is denser than fat, the person with less fat and more muscle will look smaller. Once you understand this, you will stop being so concerned with body weight and start paying attention to body composition. How much body fat do you have compared to muscle?

If you want to look slimmer, the key is to build more muscle and to burn more fat! And remember, when it comes to fat loss, exercise is the method that can be most easily manipulated… the more active you are, the more fat that you will burn! 

Here’s to happy fat loss!

  • 20th June
    2012
  • 20

New Pants Same Weight

New Pants Same Weight?

Yes! It does happen! When my clients are consistent with their strength and cardio training they often notice their clothes fitting better or even dropping a size while the scale doesn’t budge much. Then they measure themselves and see the proof on the tape. When you do resistance and/or strength training you build fat-free muscle mass. The more lean muscle you have on your body, the faster your metabolism, so you’ll torch more calories and look slimmer and toned. Muscle are hungry and metabolically active. They require three times more energy than fat for tissue maintenance and rebuilding. So while their busy burning calories for you, fat is sitting around barely burning calories the entire day. Have you ever looked at one pound of muscle vs one pound of fat? Use Google to search images and you’ll see that muscle is more dense than fat and takes up less space in the body, thus a smaller size! So,girls, don’t be afraid to pump some iron too!

(Lisa Marie Metzler)

(Source: healthyandfitmagazine.com)

  • 18th May
    2012
  • 18
  • 16th May
    2012
  • 16
  • 15th May
    2012
  • 15
"A team of researchers from the United States and Britain found that the more a person weighs, the older his or her cells appear on a molecular level, with obesity adding the equivalent of nearly nine years of age to a person’s body.”  (http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2002335131_obesity14.html)
Being overweight makes you look older.  I lost 35 pounds in 2011. Today, people think I am 10 years younger than I am.  I think the research is true that being overweight makes you look older by 9 years.  Just look at my plump face in 2010!!

"A team of researchers from the United States and Britain found that the more a person weighs, the older his or her cells appear on a molecular level, with obesity adding the equivalent of nearly nine years of age to a person’s body.”  (http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2002335131_obesity14.html)

Being overweight makes you look older.  I lost 35 pounds in 2011. Today, people think I am 10 years younger than I am.  I think the research is true that being overweight makes you look older by 9 years.  Just look at my plump face in 2010!!

  • 14th May
    2012
  • 14